Anxiety

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About Anxiety

Dealing with anxiety is a tricky one. Around one in six people are diagnosed with anxiety, a figure that has been steadily increasing over the years. It’s a condition that affects people’s daily lives and can prevent them from functioning properly.

Fear, worry and panic are a few of the symptoms. At some point everyone will suffer from this, but there are different extremes. It’s also perfectly normal to feel anxious. It’s important to understand that anxiety can be a cause of over-activity in areas of the brain, particularly with emotions or behaviour. There are many other triggers, including an imbalance of the serotonin in the brain, inherited genes, traumatic experiences and alcohol or drug misuse.

Fight or Flight

One of the common terms used with anxiety is the phrase ‘fight or flight’ which refers to the normal biological reaction of feeling threatened. When someone feels threatened hormone chemicals are released, including adrenalin. This makes people prepare themselves to either fight the situation or run away from it.

Anxiety becomes a mental health problem when it begins interrupting your daily life. This can range from panic attacks to worrying consistently, worrying about things that haven’t happened or even worrying about worrying.

One of the common terms used with anxiety is the phrase ‘fight or flight’ which refers to the normal biological reaction of feeling threatened. When someone feels threatened hormone chemicals are released, including adrenalin. This makes people prepare themselves to either fight the situation or run away from it.

Anxiety becomes a mental health problem when it begins interrupting your daily life. This can range from panic attacks to worrying consistently, worrying about things that haven’t happened or even worrying about worrying.

Anxiety UK

A leading support network for people suffering with anxiety, they also have a helpline available. To see more helplines click here.

 

Forms of anxiety.

One form of anxiety is Generalised Anxiety Disorder – (GAD) which makes people feel anxious most of the time. It’s estimated that one in twenty-five people are affected, often find it hard to sleep and struggle concentrating.

OCD is another form of anxiety that can be medically diagnosed. There a two forms of this; obsessive and compulsive. Obsessive behaviour is when unwanted thoughts repeatedly appear in your mind. Compulsive is the need to complete repetitive routines, such as hand washing or tapping.

Anxiety is also a symptom of other mental health problems including, PTSD, phobias, bipolar and depression. PTSD, formally known as post-traumatic stress disorder, can occur when someone has been through or witnessed a form of trauma. PTSD can also cause flashbacks and nightmares, often re-living the traumatic event.

Certain situations, which may seem very normal, can make someone else feel anxious. Shopping may set of anxiety as crowded areas provoke the fight or flight response.

Family

The friends and family often find it hard to relate. One of the most recommended ways of helping is to empathise with them. As much as you want them to achieve more and push themselves it’s also important not to push them too much as this may make the anxiety worse.

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Medication

Medication is one of the ways anxiety is managed, although it’s said that helping yourself can be more effective. There are four different types of medication which can be used, including; antidepressants, beta-blockers, tranquillisers and pregabalin.

For some people medication isn’t the answer and they are to be used with caution if prescribed.